November 16, 2018

#BLC 2018 Day 16: What Sewing Means to Me & Others...

...it's Happy Fri-yah, and I hope that yours has been fabulous!  Although several people tried to throw a monkey wrench on my "Yah" today, but it didn't keep me from longing for the sweet purrr of my sewing machine.  My thoughts were sort of like a cartoon caption that I saw recently that read:
All kidding aside, you'll find me doing a lot more thinking about sewing than actual sewing.  But thinking about it is an important part of the process for me.  Really, I don't think I ever go one full day with thinking about sewing.  That's what we sewist do!

I run into so many like minded people on social media, and as you know I've become quite the fan of introducing some of them on my blog.  I happened upon Iris Acevedo in the SewMuchTalent Facebook group recently, and couldn't help wanting to know more about her sewing process, and why it seemed she felt so passionate about her craft. I did find out that she also has a sewing blog so of course I wanted you to meet her too.  So I reached out to ask what sewing means to her...

Iris Acevedo, author of The Modest Life Blog


Sewing to me means purpose, creative expression, freedom, opportunity, financial prosperity, connection, sharing and I could go on.  My call to sew came over 13 years ago.  It was something that I always wanted to do.  Even as a child I found myself wanting to learn the craft.  But I was a bit of a shy child and afraid to really try.  Instead I found myself lost in the world of books and doodling 2 dimensional images of fashion dancing models in dresses or skirt sets. I went to catholic school as a child and wore uniform so my sense of fashion didn’t develop until high school. I remember spending some of my evenings sifting through my closet and finding new outfit combinations.  I still do that from time to time. Its fun and helps me to organize my sewing projects.  

When I gave my life to Christ over 13 years ago, I not only got in tune with God but I began to connect with myself in a deeper way. That led me to learn that sewing was going to be more than just a hobby for me.  Prior to starting my sewing business, I was a full-time academic advisor.  I liked what I was doing but it didn’t give me the same level of personal fulfillment or sense of purpose that I felt when I was sewing.  The opportunity to sew professionally came after the birth of my son.  It was through this process that I learned that you could use your talents and gifts to create your dream job.  While I knew that it was possible, I always saw that as something other people could do.  But God gave me the opportunity to see that I too could work my dream job.

I started The Modest Life blog as a way to creatively express myself, focus my craft and to share what I know with others.  I hope to inspire others to pursue their dreams and provide tools and knowledge to help that dream come true.  

I encourage you to drop by to visit at Iris and her Modest Life here:

Instagram: @themodestlifeblog

6 comments:

  1. Great post Ladies! Another beautiful woman with an encouraging story of a dream sewing business! It’s always nice to hear more individuals working their dream jobs! (Especially when it has anything to do with sewing, LOL!) Faye, you’ve really out done yourself this month with your Blog Like Crazy posts! Love them!

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    1. I'm thankful to meet Iris!, and I have to repeat that I'm thankful that you read here Myra!

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  2. Ooh thank you so much for introducing me to this fabulous lady. So inspiring. Thank you Faye xx

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    1. You are so welcome Diane. I'm so glad to have met great sewing bloggers like you and iris!

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  3. Great blogpost Fayedoll!Iris is a great person to watch! Thanks for the mention,too! love seeing Ir

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